CHOIR OF ST. LUKE IN THE FIELDS

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PALESTRINA: MISSA TU ES PETRUS

PALESTRINA: MISSA TU ES PETRUS

Sacred Choral Music from 16th Century Italy

Giovanni Pierluigi Da Palestrina

CHOIR OF ST. LUKE IN THE FIELDS
DAVID SHULER, director

[MS1698]

$12.95

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REVIEWS
“one of [New York City’s] finest classical choirs”
Time Out New York
“Both as an ensemble and as individual soloists, the members of the Choir of St. Luke in the Fields were consistently admirable.”
The New York Times
“[the Choir is] known for their adventuresome programming and intimate scale.”
Early Music America
PROGRAM NOTES
Little can be added to the exhaustive research that has been done about Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina. He was the most celebrated Roman composer of his day and stands with Byrd, Victoria and Lassus as one of the preeminent voices of late 16th-century church music. Often credited as the “savior of church music,” he reconciled Tridentine liturgical reforms with the artistic elements of polyphonic church music. Although the directives from the counter-reformers certainly had an impact on his music, he was equally influenced by the rich musical heritage of the Franco-Flemish composers of a generation before. Palestrina was also significantly inspired by the first glimmerings of the Baroque, particularly in his polychoral works. His influence extended well into later generations, and can be seen in the works of composers like Gregorio Allegri in the 17th century and in the motets of Alessandro Scarlatti in the 18th century.

Throughout his later years, Palestrina remained a prolific composer, setting a standard for church music that endures to the present day. Throughout his career, he was profoundly influenced by the Franco-Flemish style; the number of imitation or parody Masses based on motets by northern composers stands as a lasting testament to that admiration. The stories surrounding his adherence to the dictates of the Council of Trent and the ultimate salvation of polyphony are more legend than fact. The committee to which Palestrina was invited indeed reviewed music for use in the church, but his appointment had more to do with his unmatched skill as a composer than as a pious, dogmatically driven adversary of polyphonic music. The belief that the Counter-Reformation set about to abolish polyphony is untrue. Certainly, the use of melodic sources whose secular use was inappropriate was frowned upon, but to suggest that the Council of Trent only endorsed homophonic music based on church sources misses the point. The specific directives regarding music were in fact left to the individual provinces, and a close examination of the breadth of style in Palestrina’s music reveals a composer of considerable technical breadth, sensitivity and spirituality.


David Shuler is presently Director of Music and Organist at the historic Church of Saint Luke in the Fields in New York, where he oversees an extensive music program. In addition to an active children’s choir program, a professional choir sings masses and motets from the 15th century to the present day at the principal services of the church throughout the year. The choir is featured in an annual concert series of sacred music, and has made numerous recordings. As a conductor, Shuler is highly regarded for his vibrant historically informed performances of early music. He is also active as a synagogue musician and is the Music Director of the Dalton Chorale in Manhattan. Shuler recently completed terms as President of the Association of Anglican Musicians and President of the Anglican Musicians Foundation. Shuler was educated at the Eastman School of Music, Columbia University and the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood. He studied organ with David Craighead and Leonard Raver, composition with Joseph Schwantner, Samuel Adler and Gunther Schuller, and conducting with Amy Kaiser.

The Choir of St. Luke in the Fields has been under the direction of David Shuler since 1988. As the resident vocal ensemble at the Church of St. Luke in the Fields, the Choir regularly performs music from the 15th century to the present. The choir appears frequently in concert and is known for its historically informed performances of early music. In 2003 the Choir presented the North American premiere of Georg Phillip Telemann’s St. Matthew Passion of 1746, in 2011 the first New York City performance of C.P.E. Bach’s St. Matthew Passion of 1769 and in 2013 the North American premiere of Telemann’s St. Luke Passion of 1748. In addition, the Choir has presented a number of premieres of new works, including the New York premieres of works such as Arvo Pärt’s Berliner Messe and Missa Syllabica, Dan Locklair’s Brief Mass. The Choir consistently receives praise for its concert performances.

THE CHOIR OF ST. LUKE IN THE FIELDS
Soprano
Melissa Fogarty, Madeline Healey, Ava Pine, Amanda Sidebottom, Marcia Young
Alto
Kit Emory, Catherine Hedberg, Elizabeth Merrill
Tenor
David Root, Christopher Preston Thompson
Bass
Phillip Cheah, Michael Hofmann, Peter Walker, Christian Waugh

Consultant: Ryland Angel
 
PROGRAM
GIOVANNI PIERLUIGI DA PALESTRINA (c.1525-1594)
TU ES PETRUS | QUODCUMQUE LIGAVERIS

MISSA TU ES PETRUS
I. Kyrie
II. Gloria
III. Credo
IV. Sanctus & Benedictus
V. Agnus Dei

SICUT CERVUS | SITIVIT ANIMA MEA

CARO MEA

CANITE TUBA | RORATE CAELI

IMPROPERIUM EXPECTAVIT

SURREXIT PASTOR BONUS | ET ENIM PASCHA NOSTRUM
 



MSR Classics
MANCHICOURT: MISSA REGES TERRAE
MANCHICOURT: MISSA REGES TERRAE

CHOIR OF ST. …

[MS1632]