DARIA RABOTKINA

HUMORESQUES

HUMORESQUES


Antonín Dvořák, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Max Reger, Robert Schumann

DARIA RABOTKINA, piano

[MS1662]

$12.95

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PROGRAM NOTES
The humoresque exists because authors and composers made it so. It is not a form, it does not have a clear-cut meaning, and it certainly is not always funny. The author of the first significant musical Humoresque, Robert Schumann lamented to a friend in a letter about the lack of an adequate translation of this German word in French. The best the English language offers are the words “funny,” “sensitive,” “cozy,” and “witty.” A term of complexity and elegance, it inspired a handful of composers to explore its various sides and was revived in works of diverse magnitude. It is a curious fact that Schumann’s original humoresque is many times the size of the other miniatures with this name. Each composer approached the genre with blazing idiosyncrasy. It seems that the Humoresque medium embraced their personal peculiarities in a way that other genres seldom do. For good measure, Dvořak, Reger and Rachmaninoff wrote their Humoresques in the last six years of the 19th century. Not that I think that they conspired on this together, but it is a curiously narrow window of time for such obscure genre. It is fascinating to consider why these three, strikingly different composers all arrived at this form at the same time.


Born in Kazan, Russia, into a family of musicians, Daria Rabotkina gave her first solo recital at the age of ten, and has over the years developed a notable career as a pianist. Rabotkina’s concerto performance highlights include engagements with the San Francisco Symphony, New World Symphony, Hudson Philharmonic, Charleston Symphony and Harrisburg Symphony, and internationally with the Kirov Orchestra at the Mariinsky Theatre, Moscow State Symphony, Winnipeg Symphony, Orquesta Sinfonica de Concepcion and Turku Philharmonic Orchestra, where she played Leonard Bernstein’s Age of Anxiety. She has performed under the batons of numerous noted conductors, including Michael Tilson Thomas, Valery Gergiev, Vladimir Feltsman, Julian Kuerti, JoAnn Falletta, Benjamin Shwartz and Giancarlo Guerrero. Rabotkina has given recitals at the Kennedy Center with the Washington Performing Arts Society, Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall and Merkin Concert Hall in New York, Ravinia’s Rising Stars series, Dame Myra Hess and PianoForte Salon series in the Chicago area, Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory and in Denmark, Switzerland and Japan.

Winner of the 2007 Concert Artists Guild International Competition, Rabotkina has received top prizes at many international competitions and participated in Russia’s White Nights Festival, Finland’s Kuhmo Festival, Copenhagen’s Summer Festival and Germany’s MusikFest in Kreuth. In the United States, Rabotkina has appeared at the Rockport Chamber Music Festival, International Keyboard Institute and Festival, Music Academy of the West and PianoSummer in New Paltz.

An active recording artist, Rabotkina has released three critically acclaimed albums, all part of the Victor Elmaleh Collection: her debut recital featuring Tchaikovsky’s Grand Sonata and Prokofiev’s Ten Pieces from Romeo and Juliet, Beethoven’s Diabelli Variations and a third that features live recordings of three concertos. Rabotkina received her education at the Kazan State Conservatory and Mannes College of Music in New York City under the tutelage of Vladimir Feltsman. She holds a Doctor of Musical Arts degree and the Artist Certificate from the Eastman School of Music, where she studied with Natalya Antonova. She has taught at the Kazan State Conservatory, Music School of New York City and Eastman School of Music. Rabotkina joined the music faculty at Texas State University as Assistant Professor of Piano in the fall of 2016.

[ www.dariarabotkina.com ]
PROGRAM
ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK (1841-1904)
EIGHT HUMORESQUES, OP.101 (1894)
Vivace
Poco andante
Poco andante e molto cantabile
Poco andante
Vivace
Poco allegretto
Poco lento e grazioso
Poco andante

MAX REGER (1873-1916)
FIVE HUMORESQUES, OP.20 (1896)
Allegretto grazioso
Presto – Andante
Andantino grazioso
Prestissimo assai
Vivace assai

SERGEI RACHMANINOFF (1873-1943)
HUMORESQUE, OP.10, NO.5 (Morceaux de salon) (1894)
Allegro vivace

ROBERT SCHUMANN (1810-1856)
HUMORESQUE, OP.20 (1839)
Einfach – Sehr Rasch und leicht – Wie im Anfang
Hastig – Nach und nach immer lebhafter und starker - Wie vorher – Adagio
Einfach und zart – Intermezzo – (Einfach und zart)
Innig – Schneller – (Innig)
Sehr lebhaft – Immer lebhafter – Stretta
Mit einigem Pomp
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MSR Classics